Sunday, November 22, 2015

PTSD Diagnosis Criteria

  Is My Betrayal Trauma Actual PTSD?



(****Attention: Before you automatically rule yourself out after reading Criteria A, read the definition of Sexual Violence at the bottom)





"CURRENT DIAGNOSIS OF PTSD IS BASED ON 8 CRITERIA FROM THE DSM-5 :




* Criteria A - Exposure to actual or threatened death, actual or threatened serious injury (or "or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others" according to the DSM-IV) , or actual or threatened sexual violence in one (or more) of the following ways:

    1. Directly experiencing the traumatic event(s).

    2. Witnessing, in person, the event(s) as it occurred to others.

    3. Learning that the traumatic event(s) occurred to a close family member or close friend.  In cases of actual or threatened death of family member or friend, the event(s) must have been violent or accidental.

    4. Experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details of the traumatic event(s) (e.g., first responders collecting human remains; police officers repeatedly exposed to details of child abuse, etc.)
Note: Criteria A4 does not apply to exposure through electronic media, television, movies, or pictures, unless this exposure is work related."

* Criteria B. - Presence of one (or more) of the following intrusion symptoms associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred:

     1. Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic event(s).

     2. Recurrent distressing dreams in which the content and/or affect of the dream are related to the traumatic event(s).

     3. Dissociative reactions (e.g., flashbacks) in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring.  (Such reactions may occur on a continuum, with the most extreme expression being a complete loss of awareness of present surroundings.)

     4. Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).

     5. Marked psychological reactions to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).


* Criteria C. - Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by one or both of the following:



    1. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).

    2. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid external reminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).

* Criteria D. - Negative altercations in cognition's and mood associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:

    1. Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic event(s) (typically due to dissociative amnesia and not to other factors such as head injury, alcohol, or drugs).

    2. Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad,” “No one can be trusted,” “The world is completely dangerous,” “My whole nervous system is permanently ruined”).

    3. Persistent, distorted cognition's about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event(s) that lead the individual to blame himself/herself or others.

    4. Persistent negative emotion state (e.g., fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame).

    5. Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities.

    6. Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others.

    7. Persistent inability to experience positive emotions (e.g., inability to experience happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings).
 
* Criteria E. - Marked alterations in arousal and reactivity associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidence by two (or more) of the following:

    1. Irritable behavior and angry outbursts (with little or no provocation) typically expressed as verbal or physical aggression toward people or objects.

    2. Reckless or self-destructive behavior.

    3. Hypervigilance.

    4. Exaggerated startle response.

    5. Problems with concentration.

    6. Sleep disturbance (e.g., difficulty falling or staying asleep or restless sleep).

* Criteria F. - Duration of the disturbance (Criteria B, C, D, and E) is more than 1 month.

* Criteria G. - The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

* Criteria H. - The disturbance is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., medication, alcohol) or another medical condition."


"PTSD has two new Sub-types that have been added have been added, one of which is the PTSD dissociative sub-type. With dissociative symptoms in addition to meeting criteria for diagnosis, an individual experiences high levels of either of the following in reaction to trauma-related stimuli for at least 6 months:

Depersonalization: experience of being an outside observer of or detached from oneself (e.g., feeling as if "this is not happening to me" or one were in a dream).

Derealization: experience of unreality, distance, or distortion (e.g., "things are not real")."
http://traumadissociation.com/ptsd "




My response:


Hmmm, about the exposure to actual or threatened death in Criteria A...........How many of us wives felt like we were DYING after we continually learned about our husbands addiction or our husband's continual lies? How many of us have ever thought at one time or another that death sounded better than this hell?

Our lives felt completely over. The reality we once knew no longer existed and its terrifying. We may not always be in violent physical danger of actual death, but the threat to ourselves, our children, the danger it brings to one's soul, and the death of our reality because of our husbands sex addiction is REAL. Our husbands told us about their addiction or they continually lied to us and our brains instantly thought "Grizzly bear, stay alive!!".

Another interesting part of the criteria A above is the term "sexual violence". How many have us wives have experienced sexual violence in our marriage?

I'd say the majority.

Unsure?

Let's look at the CDC. gov definition's of Sexual Violence.

    "Sexual violence is defined as a sexual act committed against someone without that person’s freely given consent.  Sexual violence is divided into the following types:

     * Completed or attempted forced penetration of a victim

     * Completed or attempted alcohol/drug-facilitated penetration of a victim

     * Completed or attempted forced acts in which a victim is made to penetrate a perpetrator or someone else

     * Completed or attempted alcohol/drug-facilitated acts in which a victim is made to penetrate a perpetrator or someone else

     * Non-physically forced penetration which occurs after a person is pressured verbally or through intimidation or misuse of authority to consent or acquiesce

     * Unwanted sexual contact

     * Non-contact unwanted sexual experiences

Nonphysically forced penetration - which occurs after a person is pressured verbally, or through intimidation or misuse of authority, to consent or submit to being penetrated - examples include being worn down by someone who repeatedly asked for sex or showed they were unhappy; feeling pressured by being lied to, or being told promises that were untrue; having someone threaten to end a relationship or spread rumors; and sexual pressure by use of influence or authority.

Unwanted sexual contact – intentional touching, either directly or through the clothing, of the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks of any person without his or her consent, or of a person who is unable to consent or refuse. Unwanted sexual contact can be perpetrated against a person or by making a person touch the perpetrator. Unwanted sexual contact could be referred to as “sexual harassment” in some contexts, such as a school or workplace.

Noncontact unwanted sexual experiences - does not include physical contact of a sexual nature between the perpetrator and the victim. This occurs against a person without his or her consent, or against a person who is unable to consent or refuse. Some acts of non-contact unwanted sexual experiences occur without the victim’s knowledge. This type of sexual violence can occur in many different settings, such as school, the workplace, in public, or through technology. Examples include unwanted exposure to pornography or verbal sexual harassment (e.g., making sexual comments)."
http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/definitions.html



NOW what do you think? Any of these symptoms seem familiar?


***Note: Although its good to know about our trauma and the extent thereof, and its good for others to be aware of the seriousness of our trauma, unless i'ts for a needed reason I advise against trying to get officially diagnosed with PTSD from an actual medical doctor (therapists are fine). Sadly being diagnosed medically with PTSD could negatively affect insurance or custody cases because it stays in your medical record forever :(

Other Related Articles:

Codependency VS Trauma
http://makemyburdenlight.blogspot.com/2015/01/codependency-vs-trauma.html?m=1


Is There Something Wrong With Me That Attracts Sex Addicts?
http://makemyburdenlight.blogspot.com/2016/06/do-i-subconsciously-attract-sex-addicts.html?m=1

No comments:

Post a Comment